Blogs

Blogs

ASCOconnection.org is a forum for the exchange of views on topical issues in the field of oncology. The views expressed in the blogs, comments, and forums belong to the authors. They do not necessarily reflect the views or positions of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Please read the Commenting Guidelines.

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Dr. Arcita Pramudita, Dr. Lintang Sagoro, Dr. Ardita Pramudani, and Dr. Polo Camacho discuss the many barriers in attempting to integrate palliative care in Indonesia, which include a lack of patient awareness and accessibility.
Happy new year—welcome to the first issue of your member magazine in 2024.
If we believe that dietary supplements are active compounds—and many are—then we should deal with them as medications and advise our patients accordingly.
"It takes courage to see people whom you have treated lose their lives when the disease takes the upper hand," writes Dr. Pesona Grace Lucksom.
At a time when we are being asked, in every aspect of our work, to do more with less, we can expect streamlined, efficient, pragmatically designed clinical trials to play an increasingly important role in our research enterprise.
Dr. Narjust Florez, Dr. Fatima Wilder, Lauren Kiel, and Rebekah Kaufman underscore the need to comprehensively understand and address the unmet needs of young patients with lung cancer.
Dr. Joseph Merchant introduces the CPT process and recognizes ASCO colleagues who have represented the interests of members on this issue.
"Oncologists and APPs working together have the opportunity to increase practice volume, improve access to care, and ensure continuity for the patient," said Whitney Pritham.
Camille Petraitis and Christine Schlemmer discuss how the roles and responsibilities of APPs in care teams vary based on the practice setting, with an emphasis on inpatient roles and focused on a dedicated inpatient medical oncology role at a nonprofit hospital.
Severe pain can lead one to places that are uncharted, unfamiliar, and unknown.
Caregiver support is fragmented and inadequate. Here are 7 steps oncology professionals can take to address this urgent need.
Following the ASCO Annual Meeting, the conversations in the news, on social media, and in the hallways of our institutions tend to be dominated by advances in the field—promising new treatments, genetic targets unlocked, gains in overall survival.
"Unless we take prompt action to protect rural oncologists from threats related to Dobbs, there will be few left to treat rural patients with cancer," said Dr. Banu E. Symington.
Whether you participate in person in Chicago, watch sessions online, or keep up with the meeting outcomes and conversations on social media (or any combination of these), I hope the ASCO Annual Meeting leaves you feeling inspired and, above all, connected.
Novelty socks were the surprising vessel through which Dr. Jon Steinmetz built trust and connection with a withdrawn patient.
We cannot self-care our way out of the current structural failures in our health care system that contribute to burnout. We can and must do better for our learners and for our workforce.
According to Dr. Atlal Abusanad, "My experience caring for a newborn as a consultant medical oncologist is different from residency training, when I had my firstborn—both are challenging, but the challenges are different in each phase."
Early in his training, Dr. Moni Abraham Kuriakose was challenged to confront a patient's (and community's) deeply entrenched belief that cancer is always fatal.

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