Blogs

Blogs

ASCOconnection.org is a forum for the exchange of views on topical issues in the field of oncology. The views expressed in the blogs, comments, and forums belong to the authors. They do not necessarily reflect the views or positions of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Please read the Commenting Guidelines.

No Results.

Dr. Raj Mohan considers the concept of trust, and notes that what many patients will remember is how you made them feel comfortable as a human being, understood them, and stayed with them through their ups and downs.
When I was first asked if I would chair the Cancer Control for Primary Care Course in Bhutan, I immediately exclaimed yes! And then I sheepishly went to look up where exactly Bhutan was on a map.
What makes a death dignified? It's in how we live, writes Dr. Manglio Miguel Rizzo. 
Dr. Evgeniya Kharchenko dreamed of creating a local society for young specialists in Russia with ASCO’s values, and made her dream a reality.
Case-based presentations and tumor board discussions lend additional educational opportunities to this regional conference.
Dr. Richard L. Schilsky describes ASCO's Targeted Agent and Profiling Utilization Registry (TAPUR) Study and similar independent studies worldwide.
Dr. Raj Mohan describes the anxious journey that surgical oncologists and patients with cancer take together, as they wait to see what the histopathology report reveals.
"Can we increase the chances to make early diagnoses in patients with cancer? Yes, we can, I can, but how?" asks Dr. Jose Angel Sanchez.
Managing cancer is a team effort, writes Dr. Carlos Sampaio. In order to make this complex orchestra perform at its best, a few key principles are mandatory.
Cost, quality, and access to care are interconnected metrics used to evaluate health care systems. Of these, access is the most fundamental, explains Dr. Geraldine Jacobson.
The daily challenges of science and clinical care require the collective “we” to make the big, bold, creative advances that ultimately transform cancers as a whole, but individual lives around the world are changed one at the time, by the “I.” 
Even when educational meetings are offered regionally, not everyone is able to attend. Sharing the findings from these meetings in our own institutions is a great service to our colleagues and helps our patients get the best possible care.
A journal that aims to be the voice of global oncology has to publish work relating not only to differences in cancer biology due to risk factors, pathogenesis, and pharmacology, but also disparities arising from social, cultural, economic, and political resource-constraining issues.
Our recent Patient Empowerment Workshop outlined the importance of screening and early diagnosis in breast cancer, but also emphasized attention and care for women with advanced breast cancer.
During a breast cancer event in Guam, Agnes Sarthou's story about living with stage IV disease struck me very deeply, and she kindly allowed me to share part of it with you.
Multidisciplinary units are resouce-intensive, but if you have a computer, you can consult with expert colleagues around the world in a multidisciplinary tumor board.
In the wake of a natural disaster, writes Dr. Enrique Soto Pérez de Celis, small acts like checking in with a patient via text can go a long way in providing reassurance and care.
Dr. Dinesh Pendharkar outlines the current work of ASCO's International Affairs Committee. A particular emphasis this year is fostering clinical research in oncology through capacity and skill development.

Pages


Advertisement