Blogs

Blogs

ASCOconnection.org is a forum for the exchange of views on topical issues in the field of oncology. The views expressed in the blogs, comments, and forums belong to the authors. They do not necessarily reflect the views or positions of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Please read the Commenting Guidelines.

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Let’s look critically at the prospective trial evaluating the association of ringing a bell with distress experienced by patients with cancer.
As we celebrate the 20th anniversary of World Cancer Day this February 4, it’s important to recognize that we are making progress in addressing cancer.
World Cancer Day 2020 is about every one of us, and about asking for our commitment to do something to prevent cancer and support people and communities deal with cancer.
My interests in education and global oncology have allowed me to connect with great people. One of them is Dr. Julie Gralow, a fierce advocate for global oncology and an international expert in breast cancer.
When communicating prognosis, "I would suggest that we give information slowly and steadily, taking things as they come, allowing patients and their caretakers time to settle down and accept things as they are," says Dr. Raj Mohan.
As the world’s leading organization of oncology professionals who care for people with cancer, ASCO believes it is critical to understand what the public, including patients, think of, expect, and need from the nation’s cancer care system.
Wherever we live, whatever we do for our day jobs, we have a responsibility to be politically aware and politically engaged.
What had just happened in an examination room that led to that truly intimate moment in the small space of the elevator? 
The December holidays are always a hard time for my patients, and as a result, for me and my health care team. It’s hard to feel so depleted when there is so much pressure to be festive and merry.
"As oncologists," writes Dr. Ramy Sedhom, "if we are committed to healing patients, we must understand not only what cancer does to patients’ bodies, but what the disease does to them in spirit."
When a patient is looking for the word "cure," anything else, especially if vague, is not enough. "No evidence of disease" leaves room for doubt but, importantly, also room for hope.
Dr. Omid Etemadi describes the evolution of integrated cancer care in the Philippines. 
Dr. Aditya Bardia and I discuss the deep and sincere bonds we form not just with our patients but with their families. How can we ensure their needs are met, especially after a patient dies?
He was lonely and afraid after a diagnosis of prostate cancer, and I hope, wherever he is, that he is doing well.
As the complexity of cancer care has increased, so too have the pressures on oncology professionals in every setting.
After observing Health Care Quality Week, Dr. Aakash Desai and Dr. Devika Das ask, "What does quality really mean to us, especially in oncology?"
A famous castle in Byblos was illuminated pink in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month as cancer care professionals spoke out about screening and early detection.
I wondered how my mentor felt on the topic of personal and professional, on whether it is a good idea to allow a look into the person behind the white coat.

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