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If we want our patients to have the best possible health outcomes, we need to make sure that their caregivers are also being cared for.
Health care providers have a tendency to talk a lot; we are trained to ask questions, to give information, to provide advice and guidance. But if we just stop and let the silence fill the room we can learn so much from our patients. 
What makes a death dignified? It's in how we live, writes Dr. Manglio Miguel Rizzo. 
I was her doctor, and my job was to give my opinion, even if it could not be backed by any data, and then to respect hers. After all, there was only one person walking this road of cancer, and it was my job to make that road easier. 
Dr. Raj Mohan describes the anxious journey that surgical oncologists and patients with cancer take together, as they wait to see what the histopathology report reveals.
A recent event brought home the significance of how devastating news is received and how we react to a potentially life-changing message.
Almost every day a patient (and often many more than one) asks Dr. Evan Hall, “How will my cancer diagnosis affect my life?” This is a difficult question to answer. 
There are patients who meet the diagnosis of cancer not with dread, but with curiosity, and sometimes their preferred treatment strategy is, "Let's just see what happens."  
Drs. Janet Bull and Lindsay Bonsignore answer thoughtful questions about telemedicine posed by attendees at the 2017 Palliative and Supportive Care in Oncology Symposium.
In my experience, cancer treatment plans rarely progress linearly. The further we veer from the anticipated course, the more wrong and dark and sinister it feels. 
Our patients bring the context of their lives into the hospitals and cancer centers where they receive care, including experiences of abuse and trauma. Patient-centered care means addressing situations that may be triggers for these patients or cause them emotional harm.
My hope for the new year is that more of our patients with cancer will experience a miracle thanks to precision medicine.
We all have them: the needy patients who take an extraordinary amount of your time and effort. Consider that they aren't needy, but in need. And we can help.
We all hope that our families will stick together through thick and thin, be there to celebrate in each other’s joy, and be the people who will catch us when we fall. But, I know that there is no rule book when it comes to this.
I understood cancer as an oncologist: I understood its breadth. The manifestation of disease. Now, as a cancer caregiver, I understand its depth.
It's unacceptable that patients fall through the cracks of our health care system. Oncologists and patients need to sit at the table with policymakers to create real change.
Guideline co-chairs Drs. Timothy Gilligan and Walter Baile highlight specific recommendations for better communication and provide some examples of how they can translate into practice.