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ASCOconnection.org is a forum for the exchange of views on topical issues in the field of oncology. The views expressed in the blogs, comments, and forums belong to the authors. They do not necessarily reflect the views or positions of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Please read the Commenting Guidelines.

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This year's sessions will feature cutting-edge research and opportunities for oncology, palliative care clinicians, and other health care professionals to network, develop collaborations, learn from one another, and grow professionally.
I began serving as Editor in Chief of ASCO Connection in 2006, and will conclude my second term in December 2016. It has been—and is!—a pleasure to lead our member publication, and it will be hard to say goodbye at the end of the year.
Subterfuge never solves sexual dysfunction after cancer. Patients and their partners need to talk to each other, and from that talk comes understanding and sharing and empathy and, eventually, solutions and resolution.
ASCO composed and successfully brought to the AMA-HOD several resolutions representing some of our most pressing concerns and/or initiatives, including regulations on handling hazardous materials, transparency on clinical pathways, reimbursement models, and Part B drug payments.
Last week I introduced the theme I’ve selected for my term as ASCO President, Together, we’ll be making a difference for our patients and in our profession with the help of some game-changing initiatives from ASCO, of which I will describe just a few.
Twitter and Virtual Meeting add new layers of depth to 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting presentations.
Much of the news this week in prostate cancer will be generated by the ASCO Annual Meeting in Chicago. There are likely to be considerable news releases regarding precision medicine, and especially AR-V7, so I thought I would explain this a bit.
We recently converted our electronic record system to EPIC, and the new perspective provides useful illumination. Truly patient-focused care requires that our practice and our records—verbal, written, or electronic—place the patient center stage.
It is my pleasure to welcome you to Chicago for the 52nd ASCO Annual Meeting. I chose the theme of “Collective Wisdom: The Future of Patient-Centered Care and Research” to represent the importance of the multimodal care that is necessary for our patients.
When you and your patient are in uncharted territory in the cancer landscape, the words you choose to communicate uncertainty and the way you convey them matter a great deal.
ASCO has published an updated framework for assessing the relative value of cancer therapies that have been compared in clinical trials in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.
Nurse-led patient navigation services are clearly valuable. A study being presented at #ASCO16 may provide enough evidence of a survival benefit to make these services reimbursable.
A brief NCORP update. The NCTN and NCORP continue to open and modify Precision Medicine clinical trials including ALCHEMIST, LungMAP, Exceptional Responders, and NCI MATCH.
Dr. Teresa Gilewski is honored to serve as Chair of this year’s ASCO Book Club, featuring When Breath Becomes Air, written by Stanford neurosurgery resident Paul Kalanithi, MD, after his diagnosis with metastatic lung cancer at age 36.
Today ASCO issued its first clinical practice guideline on invasive cervical cancer, with recommendations organized according to health system resource availability levels. I was honored to serve as Co-Chair of the Expert Panel, along with Dr. Linus Chuang.
Having completed my year as President-Elect, I have been struck by the many facets in which ASCO does indeed endeavor to conquer cancer—which leads to my Presidential theme, ASCO: Making a Difference in Cancer Care with You.
This is the story of how, like Mr. Smith in Washington, the medical community in Brazil gathered to speak truth to power about the lack of evidence for phosphoethanolamine as a cancer treatment.
I have seen many patients grapple with the consequences of cancer and its treatment on their own sexual view of themselves (their sexual self-schema), and how it can impact the relationship between partners.

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