Latest Blogs

Jan 19, 2023
Dr. Kathryn DeCarli and Dr. Jonathan Marron consider the actions an oncologist must, ought, and should take when offering professional medical interpretation services to a patient.
Dec 08, 2022
ASCO’s delegation to the American Medical Association’s House of Delegates (AMA HOD) recently traveled to Honolulu for the Interim meeting. Our resolutions primarily focused on the threat of legislation that could criminalize medically necessary care in the wake of the Supreme Court’s decision...
Dec 07, 2022
“Sitting here now, at 51 years old and as a cancer survivor of five years, the importance of self-care has become quite clear to me," writes Dr. Doug Flora.
Nov 28, 2022
I began my medical career in Arizona, where I received an early lesson in the importance of cultural sensitivity thanks to members of the Navajo Nation from the Four Corners region.
Subscribe to this column

Don S. Dizon, MD, FACP, FASCO

Don S. Dizon, MD, FACP, FASCO, is a professor of medicine and professor of surgery at Brown University, director of the Pelvic Malignancies Program and Hematology-Oncology Outpatient Clinics at Lifespan Cancer Institute, and director of Medical Oncology and the Sexual Health First Responders Clinic at Rhode Island Hospital. He also serves as the head of community outreach and engagement of the Legorreta Cancer Center at Brown University. Dr. Dizon has served as past chair of ASCO's Social Media Working Group and the Cancer Communications Committee. In addition to his regular column on ASCOconnection.org, which has been honored with APEX awards in 2013 and 2014, he is a blogger for The Oncologist and a section editor of Gynecologic Oncology at UpToDate. Dr. Dizon is a member of the JCO Oncology Practice Editorial Board, and editor in chief of the ASCO Educational Book. Follow Dr. Dizon across social media channels @drdonsdizon. 

Disclosure.

Jan 15, 2016
I like to consider myself an “evolved” clinician—one who believes in the patient’s voice, personally invested in shared decision-making, always ready to support my patient’s decisions, as long as I know it’s informed by the best data I have available, even when it is not the course I would want...
Dec 31, 2015
One of things I like about academic oncology is the chance to collaborate with others, both within my fields of specialization and outside of them.
Dec 10, 2015
She had been a patient for several years, and I still remember meeting her that first time: Her breast cancer was stage IV at diagnosis, already established in her bones; she was scared; she was in pain. Surgery was taken off the table and she was referred for medical therapy. We had discussed...
Nov 16, 2015
As physicians practicing in the worlds of oncology and gynecology, we have used this word countless times—hope that cancer will not return, hope that intimacy can be restored, hope that parenthood can be realized despite cancer.
Nov 09, 2015
Bruce cites his upbringing as the impetus to improve cancer care on a global scale. My interests are just as granular and stem from where I was born and raised, in the tiny South Pacific Island of Guam.
Oct 29, 2015
The concept of engagement leading to empowerment was a message I have heard loudly and clearly. It was a conversation brewing on social media—a cacophony of voices calling for more access, better information, more direct involvement in their care.

Pages