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ASCOconnection.org is a forum for the exchange of views on topical issues in the field of oncology. The views expressed in the blogs, comments, and forums belong to the authors. They do not necessarily reflect the views or positions of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Please read the Commenting Guidelines.

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The program is now available for this year's Research Community Forum Annual Meeting. Dr. Richard L. Schilsky invites you to join this unique event on September 24-25 in Alexandria, VA.
Here are 10 reasons why we should look at postoperative radiation for regional melanoma.
At the Plenary Session of this year’s ASCO Annual Meeting, the results of a longitudinal trial begun in 2007 showed me that patient engagement is much more important that I had imagined.
We’re making progress in better understanding, and communicating, the many issues surrounding adverse events, although not as fast as we’d like. In the long run, our patients will benefit from all of these initiatives.
The advent of rapid and relatively affordable high-throughput molecular analyses has permitted the development of a bewildering next generation of new cancer diagnostic tests that are being introduced into clinical care using our grandparents’ regulatory structure.
Dr. Richard L. Schilsky outlines the Society's Target Agent and Profiling Utilization Registry (TAPUR) Study and similar international protocols. A global data sharing platform could greatly accelerate our ability to learn about new uses for currently approved targeted anticancer drugs.
The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) Annual Meeting took place on October 17-18. Here are some highlights on a selection of many of the topics and interactions over that meeting.
“When are we going to cure cancer?” If I had a dime for every time I’ve been asked that...The trite answer is that we already cure many cancers, just not enough of them! But the real question should be, “Why don’t we cure all cancers?”
Inequalities, especially in health care, breed discontent. We need better ways to continue incentivizing the development of new drugs while optimizing access. Biosimilars help, but they won't solve the whole problem.
We all strive to provide evidence-based medicine, yet putting it into practice can sometimes be the most challenging part of being a doctor.
Many of the successful, FDA-approved drugs commonly used in cancer care were developed at small biotech or pharma companies—so what role do the "big fish" play?
Support for federal research funding for cancer is not about politics. It's about people. There is no one in our society—liberal, conservative, libertarian, or just don’t care—who isn’t touched in some way by cancer.
For prostate cancer, there are both challenges and some early positive results from immunotherapy trials that remain intriguing. One of the key challenges is identifying those patients who will benefit from the treatment.
The ASCO Research Community Forum Annual Meeting is in September. As Chair of the Research Community Forum Council, I’m very excited about what’s in store for this year’s meeting and would like to encourage all researchers and research staff to join us for this enriching event.
Drug companies play a key role in improving cancer care, but financial toxicity for patients continues to worsen. Eternal vigilance is the price of liberty from excessive drug costs, and we have an ethical obligation to hold pharmaceutical companies accountable.
Much of the news this week in prostate cancer will be generated by the ASCO Annual Meeting in Chicago. There are likely to be considerable news releases regarding precision medicine, and especially AR-V7, so I thought I would explain this a bit.
We have discussed risk, biology, and the importance of complete reporting. So how do we decide to actually use RNI?
How we report clinical trials makes interpreting their results harder. Why shouldn’t we all have more information to make better decisions for our patients?

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