Blogs

Blogs

ASCOconnection.org is a forum for the exchange of views on topical issues in the field of oncology. The views expressed in the blogs, comments, and forums belong to the authors. They do not necessarily reflect the views or positions of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Please read the Commenting Guidelines.

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We may never be able to completely eliminate anxiety and stress before and after scans, yet we can definitely make a difference by confronting scanxiety upfront.
I tend to be cautious with the word cure, because sometimes that is the only thing that patients hear.
Bad news is something that we in health care are practised in telling, but I for one have never gotten used to it.
When the travel ban was announced, I worried for my patients and for my colleagues. I worried that medical care would be denied to international patients, including those who came to the U.S. for cancer care.
Making patients happy isn't just about doing whatever they ask. As health care professionals, we have an obligation to look out for their best interests.
When it comes to many alternative therapies, the data is too sparse to inform discussions on benefits and/or risks, as my patient learned when her supplement use prevented her from continuing on a clinical trial.
On behalf of the ASCO Professional Development Committee, Dr. Suresh S. Ramalingam welcomes you to the Physician Wellness blog, a space for discussion and perspectives on physician wellness and professional burnout.
When faced with a diagnosis of cancer, my patients and their families show more courage than I could ever have imagined.
Dr. Maher Saifo, an oncologist practicing in Syria, discusses how the Syrian war is affecting cancer care in a post written with his patient, Lama Meer Yousef. Together, they share their story of survival and hope against incredible odds.
With new therapies, fortunately, oncologists are now seeing patients over the span of years, and we get to know the person who is the patient beyond their illness. Many also bring along others on visit after visit, and we get to know each of them too.
I cannot count the number of times I have thought to myself, “If it were not for the PSA, you would no doubt be out there playing golf, skiing, biking, taking a grandchild to the park, or just enjoying life.” Living from one PSA to the next is a bad way to mark the passing of time.
As a physician and a mom, I'm doing what all human beings do every day: making decisions about my life, career, and relationships, and hoping for the best.
As we move forward in oncology, my hope is that we will see miraculous recoveries more often, guided not by chance but by a better understanding of cancer biology. The promise of precision medicine remains a real one that I firmly believe in.
As oncologists, we are shaped and molded by our patients. December is a perfect time to reflect on our patients and ourselves, with the hope that we will be able to improve our future.
Survival rates for many types of cancers have continued to improve over the past several decades, contributing to a growing number of long-term cancer survivors. With longer survival, attention to the chronic and long-term adverse treatment effects has become increasingly important.
Writing a prescription is the easiest part of we do in clinic. The harder part is truly understanding the financial burden a cancer diagnosis inflicts on patients and their families.
Many of the couples that I see in my practice grow closer after the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. But for others, the experience of serious illness exposes existing weak points in their relationship.
When we are at the bedside, eye to eye with the patient and their families, we can do more than any website, journal, or even Dr. Google can to help our patients understand their cancer and their treatment.

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