Blogs

Blogs

ASCOconnection.org is a forum for the exchange of views on topical issues in the field of oncology. The views expressed in the blogs, comments, and forums belong to the authors. They do not necessarily reflect the views or positions of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Please read the Commenting Guidelines.

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I applaud the Foundation for Women’s Cancers for highlighting the importance of trials, and join them in their push for more trial options for not only my own patients, but for all patients with cancer.
“When are we going to cure cancer?” If I had a dime for every time I’ve been asked that...The trite answer is that we already cure many cancers, just not enough of them! But the real question should be, “Why don’t we cure all cancers?”
We all strive to provide evidence-based medicine, yet putting it into practice can sometimes be the most challenging part of being a doctor.
We have discussed risk, biology, and the importance of complete reporting. So how do we decide to actually use RNI?
How we report clinical trials makes interpreting their results harder. Why shouldn’t we all have more information to make better decisions for our patients?
Deciding whether RNI works depends upon not only accurate risk assessment but also a better understanding of the disease. Here are some key elements of breast cancer and treatment that aren’t adequately decided just by looking at pathologic stage, grade, and surgery type.
To determine when radiation helps treat lymph nodes, we need to carefully interpret surgical findings and accurately stage breast cancer to best understand the risk of lymph node involvement.
Two recently published large clinical trials, NCIC MA.20 and EORTC 22922, raised a lot of interest in and a lot of questions about when radiation helps for treating lymph nodes in breast cancer. The data are more complicated than often presented.
One of the most frequent questions I hear in my clinic is, “Are we making any progress?” or, “Is there anything new out there?” The answer is always yes, or more properly, YES!
The past year had been a tremendously exciting time to be an oncologist, and to be a lung cancer oncologist in particular. It seems we hardly have time to get used to one newly approved agent before another one becomes available.
Winner: Association Media & Publishing 2016 EXCEL Award, Best Single Blog Post
The good kind of problem is having too many choices; the bad kind of problem is having too few choices. Today, I am writing about the ultimate in the good kind of problems: Being an exceptional responder to cancer treatment. I am even trying to enroll in the NCI Exceptional Responders Initiative.
Dr. Robert Mayer and Dr. Gabriel N. Hortobagyi were named as distinguished members of the OncLive 2015 Giants in Cancer class.
Please join the Conquer Cancer Foundation as we extend the momentum of The Campaign to Conquer Cancer. As much as we need your donations to raise $150 million, we need your leadership and your voice even more.
A few months ago, I became aware of the ongoing measles outbreak that has been traced back to visits to Disneyland in Anaheim, CA, which began in December 2014. I remember reading the news reports, including the defense of those who did not believe that vaccines are safe, and witnessed the pleas...
For the past month or so, one patient after another has come in with the question, “So, what do you think about 4-MU?” or “Did you hear about poliovirus killing cancer?” Actually, I have heard next to nothing about either, but of course I was intrigued as to where my patients get their information.
For years now, we have had a raging debate in the renal cell carcinoma (RCC) community regarding the use of adjuvant therapy. In a patient with no evidence of metastatic disease following surgery, the standard...
I happened to be standing in her office when Tina, our research nurse, received an email from one of our patients. This patient had recurrent ovarian cancer and was on her third-line of treatment. She was seen at our center for clinical trials, and Tina and I had spent some time discussing one...

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