Blogs

Blogs

ASCOconnection.org is a forum for the exchange of views on topical issues in the field of oncology. The views expressed in the blogs, comments, and forums belong to the authors. They do not necessarily reflect the views or positions of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Please read the Commenting Guidelines.

No Results.

Working in oncology does not confer immunity from this disease, but I have wished that it did in some way.
The surgeon had successfully removed her cancer, and the hope was that she would be cured and could live now without needing chemotherapy. “Live?” she asked. “I cannot live like this. I cannot.”
Instead of another lecture on how to sign up for social media, I thought I would share my experience, along with specific examples of how it has directly led to professional benefits.
Women with cancer deserve a discussion about fertility preservation and the opportunity to discuss their concerns regarding sex, even if they are teenagers. But sometimes parents disagree.
It takes a lot of courage to face down fear and discomfort, but it can lead to happy outcomes.
We have discussed risk, biology, and the importance of complete reporting. So how do we decide to actually use RNI?
“Before I send in the prescription for this new treatment, let’s make sure you can afford it.” This is something I say in all of my consultations.
Whether you love or hate e-prescribing depends on whether you are writing, filling, or taking the pills.
How we report clinical trials makes interpreting their results harder. Why shouldn’t we all have more information to make better decisions for our patients?
Deciding whether RNI works depends upon not only accurate risk assessment but also a better understanding of the disease. Here are some key elements of breast cancer and treatment that aren’t adequately decided just by looking at pathologic stage, grade, and surgery type.
To determine when radiation helps treat lymph nodes, we need to carefully interpret surgical findings and accurately stage breast cancer to best understand the risk of lymph node involvement.
Dr. Nagi El Saghir reflects on the challenges of delivering cancer care in regions rocked by hostilities, but sees hope in impactful educational and scientific meetings such as the recent Beirut Breast Cancer Conference (BBCC-4).
Two recently published large clinical trials, NCIC MA.20 and EORTC 22922, raised a lot of interest in and a lot of questions about when radiation helps for treating lymph nodes in breast cancer. The data are more complicated than often presented.
When patients express fears and misgivings in clinic, there is an opportunity to dispel myths, diminish shame, and focus on living a full life despite cancer.
The American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) invited all ABIM-certified physicians to participate in a review of the blueprints that outline content areas for subspecialty Maintenance of Certification (MOC) exams.
Most times, I feel excited to be an oncologist. Oncology research is accelerating and every week brings more news, whether it be a deeper understanding of tumor genomics, a broader understanding of cancer genetics and risk, and, it seems, more ways to provide precision therapy. Studies are coming...
During 2 weeks of challenging inpatient hospital service, I made it my goal to give my residents the best possible exposure to our field, and to allow them as much autonomy as possible.
Dr. Fredrick Chite Asirwa illustrates that every person in the clinic has an impact on patients.

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