Blogs

Blogs

ASCOconnection.org is a forum for the exchange of views on topical issues in the field of oncology. The views expressed in the blogs, comments, and forums belong to the authors. They do not necessarily reflect the views or positions of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Please read the Commenting Guidelines.

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Joan was 42, married, but appeared to be younger than that. Her husband was with her when we first met, as was her beautiful two-year-old son. “We couldn’t get a baby sitter, if you can believe that!” she said.Sarah was 38 and was also married. She and I were closer to the same age, which...
One of the things I enjoy as an academic oncologist is the opportunity to teach. I like having students, residents, and fellows in my clinic and the opportunity for them to see what oncology is and what we do; how we "marry" the art and science of medicine in our routine care of patients with...
Everyday, we talk to people who are newly diagnosed with cancer…. To them, their worlds have just been turned upside down. They listen in shock and disbelief…. Wondering what just happened, and what will happen next…. It’s as though cancer has an inextricable power to hold people hostage. Despite...
For two years, I’ve participated in #bcsm, a rich breast cancer and social media community founded on Twitter. It has encouraged me to ask: why not design similar resources for people with other diseases?
Everywhere you look, there are things we can be doing better....on a personal level, we can be better clinicians, researchers, educators and leaders; on a systems' level, we can be improving quality, cost, and access to health care; on a societal level, we can be solving the problems of the world...
Last month, my family experienced the loss of someone very dear- Uncle Peter. Peter was an ex-Marine, father of three men, and patriarch of my spouse’s family; not to mention, husband to my wonderful and artistic Aunt Helene. He had been admitted to an outside hospital with leg ischemia and was...
I was sitting in the Fellows and Junior Faculty Lounge at the ASCO 2013 Annual Meeting, talking to Simon—a young medical oncology fellow with interests in global health, who is committed to developing the next generation of oncologic agents to bring to market in an economically feasible way. . . ....
I never thought I would see the day when two abstracts about cervical cancer would be included as plenary presentations at the Annual Meeting. Cervical cancer, after all, is a rare disease in the U.S. and developed countries— we have access to cervical cancer screening programs and the HPV vaccine...
The print edition of the Educational Book is a labor of love each year, and this one was no exception.
Dr. Jyoti D. Patel shares what you can expect to see and learn at the 2013 ASCO Annual Meeting.
I still recall my first rotation as an inpatient attending at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC). Perhaps it was the anxiety that I remembered most; that I was “in charge” of a service. Fortunately, having done fellowship at MSKCC, the system was not a foreign one, and I knew exactly...
A feeling of introspection always marks the end of the year for me. Perhaps it is because of medicine and of oncology—but, as January approaches, I am cognizant of time and how precious it truly is. I find myself reminiscing about the year through photographs (with the help of iPhoto, I have them...
New Years has always been one of my favorite holidays. It’s the one time of year that everyone—regardless of race, religion, or region of residence—gets together to celebrate a year gone by and a new one yet to come. For me, it’s a time of reflection, looking back over the past year, scavenging...
“Still having trouble wrapping my head around all the tweets. They say so little…but I’ll keep trying.”
I only met her once; she was young—in her mid-thirties—and she had been diagnosed with ovarian cancer during her pregnancy. Following chemotherapy and the delivery of a healthy baby, she underwent a hysterectomy and staging. She was ultimately diagnosed with a rare ovarian cancer: small cell...
In these days of economic belt-tightening, funds for oncology research and education seem to perpetually be on the chopping block. That’s why it’s more important than ever to support those who support us.
As some of you may know, I am doing an Executive MBA in Healthcare Leadership at the Yale School of Management in my “spare” time. I love the program and am learning a ton. There was something a professor said the other day—no, not a novel way to think about linear programming, problem framing,...
I have been thinking about the cancer experience—what it must be like to be on the receiving end of a cancer diagnosis, to live with cancer, and to experience the treatments; to receive the news that treatment worked or that it didn’t. I also have been thinking about what it must be like to “carry...

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