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ASCOconnection.org is a forum for the exchange of views on topical issues in the field of oncology. The views expressed in the blogs, comments, and forums belong to the authors. They do not necessarily reflect the views or positions of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Please read the Commenting Guidelines.

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Dr. Raj Mohan describes the anxious journey that surgical oncologists and patients with cancer take together, as they wait to see what the histopathology report reveals.
During a breast cancer event in Guam, Agnes Sarthou's story about living with stage IV disease struck me very deeply, and she kindly allowed me to share part of it with you.
Multidisciplinary units are resouce-intensive, but if you have a computer, you can consult with expert colleagues around the world in a multidisciplinary tumor board.
In the wake of a natural disaster, writes Dr. Enrique Soto Pérez de Celis, small acts like checking in with a patient via text can go a long way in providing reassurance and care.
Dr. Maher Saifo, an oncologist practicing in Syria, discusses how the Syrian war is affecting cancer care in a post written with his patient, Lama Meer Yousef. Together, they share their story of survival and hope against incredible odds.
Reflecting on the challenges of delivering cancer care in regions rocked by hostilities, but seeing hope in impactful educational and scientific meetings such as the recent Beirut Breast Cancer Conference (BBCC-4).
Dr. Fredrick Chite Asirwa illustrates that every person in the clinic has an impact on patients.
There are so many myths about cancers and their causation that may be detrimental to cancer control efforts, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, Dr. Fredrick Chite Asirwa explains.
Patients in Dr. Sana Al Sukhun's clinic frequently ask, especially if cancer was on the news, “Is there anything new?” The answer is always yes.
Helen* had received multiple lines of chemotherapy for a stage IV breast cancer. She had been off treatment for quite a few months now and declined hospice because she did not like strangers in the house.
Bruce cites his upbringing as the impetus to improve cancer care on a global scale. My interests are just as granular and stem from where I was born and raised, in the tiny South Pacific Island of Guam.
The auditorium was designed for around 400 people, but only a quarter of the place was occupied. Some people were sitting next to each other; some were hiding alone at the end of the hall.

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