Blogs

Blogs

ASCOconnection.org is a forum for the exchange of views on topical issues in the field of oncology. The views expressed in the blogs, comments, and forums belong to the authors. They do not necessarily reflect the views or positions of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Please read the Commenting Guidelines.

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Dr. Raj Mohan describes the anxious journey that surgical oncologists and patients with cancer take together, as they wait to see what the histopathology report reveals.
A recent event brought home the significance of how devastating news is received and how we react to a potentially life-changing message.
Almost every day a patient (and often many more than one) asks Dr. Evan Hall, “How will my cancer diagnosis affect my life?” This is a difficult question to answer. 
There are patients who meet the diagnosis of cancer not with dread, but with curiosity, and sometimes their preferred treatment strategy is, "Let's just see what happens."  
Drs. Janet Bull and Lindsay Bonsignore answer thoughtful questions about telemedicine posed by attendees at the 2017 Palliative and Supportive Care in Oncology Symposium.
In my experience, cancer treatment plans rarely progress linearly. The further we veer from the anticipated course, the more wrong and dark and sinister it feels. 
Our patients bring the context of their lives into the hospitals and cancer centers where they receive care, including experiences of abuse and trauma. Patient-centered care means addressing situations that may be triggers for these patients or cause them emotional harm.
My hope for the new year is that more of our patients with cancer will experience a miracle thanks to precision medicine.
We all have them: the needy patients who take an extraordinary amount of your time and effort. Consider that they aren't needy, but in need. And we can help.
We all hope that our families will stick together through thick and thin, be there to celebrate in each other’s joy, and be the people who will catch us when we fall. But, I know that there is no rule book when it comes to this.
I understood cancer as an oncologist: I understood its breadth. The manifestation of disease. Now, as a cancer caregiver, I understand its depth.
It's unacceptable that patients fall through the cracks of our health care system. Oncologists and patients need to sit at the table with policymakers to create real change.
Guideline co-chairs Drs. Timothy Gilligan and Walter Baile highlight specific recommendations for better communication and provide some examples of how they can translate into practice.
Asking a partner to imagine himself in the patient's place helped bridge an empathy gap and move a hard conversation forward.
With support from ASCO's Quality Training Program, Dr. Arjun Gupta and his team were able to make major reductions in patient wait time for chemotherapy.
Dr. Regina A. Jacob tells the stories of two women with two very different diagnoses who respond, psychologically, contrarily to what you would expect.
More than 100 oncology practices have signed up to participate in ASCO's big data initiative. "We need good data, and lots of it, if we’re to draw meaningful conclusions that can improve patient care," writes CancerLinQ CEO Kevin Fitzpatrick.
During a breast cancer event in Guam, Agnes Sarthou's story about living with stage IV disease struck me very deeply, and she kindly allowed me to share part of it with you.

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