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ASCOconnection.org is a forum for the exchange of views on topical issues in the field of oncology. The views expressed in the blogs, comments, and forums belong to the authors. They do not necessarily reflect the views or positions of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Please read the Commenting Guidelines.

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When your day seems to be a cascade of bad news, your attitude about stress can impact its effect on you. Dr. Julia Close shares a personal story about maintaining perspective during a challenging time.
"As a mother and an oncologist, there are always times when I am plagued with doubt, feeling I could be more fully present in one role if I wasn’t worrying about the other," says Dr. Jane Lowe Meisel.
In the wake of a natural disaster, writes Dr. Enrique Soto Pérez de Celis, small acts like checking in with a patient via text can go a long way in providing reassurance and care.
After ADT for prostate cancer, many couples are surprised by the cascade of changes in their relationship - both physical and emotional - that result from a lack of testosterone.
I often wonder if patients know what it’s like to leave a clinical practice for us as clinicians—if they wonder if they ever cross our minds. I hope with this blog I can answer that not only for myself, but for my compassionate colleagues who have chosen medicine, and specifically oncology.
"At different points in the retreat, I felt indebted to the women who came before me... and renewed by the ideas we all have to make a world of difference in cancer care," writes Dr. Stephanie Graff.
When a new patient comes to see you about a cancer diagnosis, think about the invisible things they may be carrying to the visit, such as fear, anxiety, sleepless nights, financial worries, and concern for their loved ones.
Dr. Dinesh Pendharkar outlines the current work of ASCO's International Affairs Committee. A particular emphasis this year is fostering clinical research in oncology through capacity and skill development.
I applaud the Foundation for Women’s Cancers for highlighting the importance of trials, and join them in their push for more trial options for not only my own patients, but for all patients with cancer.
As fellows, we are the faculty members and program directors of tomorrow, so it really is up to us to make sense of how to maintain the necessary rigor to get through medical training but also how to live and let live while doing it.
In this issue’s Trainee & Early-Career section, Dr. Melissa Loh shares thoughtful, practical advice for oncology fellows thinking about pursuing a second degree while completing ...
The concept of a person having cancer and not needing any treatment was somewhat foreign to Dr. Suneel D. Kamath when he first started training. However, within just a few months, he realized that this is the case for thousands of people.
As I prepare to take on a new professional position, I have been reflecting on what academic medicine means, and how to thrive in it.
After more than 10 years of college, medical school, and training, you’re finally an attending! Many people feel that this transition is harder than starting internship, because all of a sudden, you—and only you—are calling the shots.
In a divisive time, I look to my patients and see that there is more that unites us than divides us, and this is worth celebrating.
Never doubt that your voice and time matter when it comes to trying to change the world in a positive way. We as a community can come together and really make a difference, and you can see it firsthand any weekend in almost any city across the country.
The line of thinking that women can do without their breasts only makes breast cancer treatment easier for us as physicians, not for our patients. When it's your own body, every organ is vital.
The program is now available for this year's Research Community Forum Annual Meeting. Dr. Richard L. Schilsky invites you to join this unique event on September 24-25 in Alexandria, VA.

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