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ASCOconnection.org is a forum for the exchange of views on topical issues in the field of oncology. The views expressed in the blogs, comments, and forums belong to the authors. They do not necessarily reflect the views or positions of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Please read the Commenting Guidelines.

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“When are we going to cure cancer?” If I had a dime for every time I’ve been asked that...The trite answer is that we already cure many cancers, just not enough of them! But the real question should be, “Why don’t we cure all cancers?”
I recently completed my residency and the accompanying long process of finding my first position after training. Looking for that job was so different than applying for residency; if you're in the process of job searching, here are some tips from someone who was just in your shoes.
As physicians, Dr. Michael K. Keng writes, we have the responsibility not only to care for our patients, but to improve patient care. Quality improvement is often known as a mechanism to reduce cost, but it is also an opportunity to improve the full patient experience. 
Vice President Joe Biden and the government-wide Cancer Moonshot Task Force have presented today a sweeping vision that, if realized, could change the face of cancer prevention, screening, treatment, and survivorship as we know it.
It's a mistake to assume that we become more prepared for death as we get older.
Inequalities, especially in health care, breed discontent. We need better ways to continue incentivizing the development of new drugs while optimizing access. Biosimilars help, but they won't solve the whole problem.
We all strive to provide evidence-based medicine, yet putting it into practice can sometimes be the most challenging part of being a doctor.
It's up to us to advise our patients not to share medications, despite their generous natures. At best, the medications are ineffective because they aren't used properly; at worst, misuse can cause active harm.
People with cancer and their caregivers need to think about pacing themselves for what may turn out to be a marathon, says Dr. Lidia Schapira.
Highlights from the 11th annual Best of ASCO Lebanon, attended by more than 300 medical professional from the country and surrounding region.
The ASCO MOC alternate pathway proposal shifts the focus of the recertification process to continuous learning in oncology. As this plan is meant to address your needs, the proposal is presented for your input.
Diane St. Germain and Dr. Sandra Mitchell invite symposium attendees to share their thoughts about gaps in knowledge and priorities for palliative care research in oncology with staff from the National Cancer Institute on Friday, September 9.
Cancer unavoidably leads to losses. Letting go of what I have lost has allowed me to accept and be grateful for what I, for the moment, have. I wish that I could have started doing this without getting sick.
Join fellow attendees to discuss mortality and caring for patients with advanced cancer at the third annual Death Cafe at the 2016 Palliative Care in Oncology Symposium.
Many of the successful, FDA-approved drugs commonly used in cancer care were developed at small biotech or pharma companies—so what role do the "big fish" play?
ASCO CEO Dr. Clifford Hudis describes the Society's Global Oncology programs and the initiatives of the Global Oncology Leadership Task Force. Dr. Hudis asks challenging questions about providing optimal cancer care in low-income countries. 
It’s abundantly clear that more heads are better than one when it comes to cancer care, and that working together as a team of experts (including the patient, who is the expert on their life) leads to the best outcomes.
Support for federal research funding for cancer is not about politics. It's about people. There is no one in our society—liberal, conservative, libertarian, or just don’t care—who isn’t touched in some way by cancer.

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