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ASCOconnection.org is a forum for the exchange of views on topical issues in the field of oncology. The views expressed in the blogs, comments, and forums belong to the authors. They do not necessarily reflect the views or positions of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Please read the Commenting Guidelines.

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Dr. Edward S. Kim encourages you to register today and join the Research Community Forum in September for 2 days of learning and collaboration.
As the NSABP celebrates its 60th anniversary in 2018, Dr. Harry D. Bear honors the organization's history and accomplishments.
Clinical trials are the pathway to better treatments, better outcomes, and a future without cancer. We, as investigators, need to believe in them, and be willing to offer them to all patients who are eligible. 
ASCO's current president explains why he's passionate about precision medicine, as well as the concerns that keep him up at night. 
A trial of aqueous lidocaine to manage painful intercourse for breast cancer survivors was a small study with a great magnitude of benefit. Do we need to wait for more data, or can we start applying these findings for our patients today?
Dr. Richard L. Schilsky describes ASCO's Targeted Agent and Profiling Utilization Registry (TAPUR) Study and similar independent studies worldwide.
Only 11% of randomized trials give enough detail to practically use in clinical practice. Here are five ways we can use internet-based communication to make it easier for academic innovators to get credit for their work, and  to implement new findings for our patients.
A journal that aims to be the voice of global oncology has to publish work relating not only to differences in cancer biology due to risk factors, pathogenesis, and pharmacology, but also disparities arising from social, cultural, economic, and political resource-constraining issues.
More than 100 oncology practices have signed up to participate in ASCO's big data initiative. "We need good data, and lots of it, if we’re to draw meaningful conclusions that can improve patient care," writes CancerLinQ CEO Kevin Fitzpatrick.
We have a responsibility to design clinical trials that reflect our patient mix, and to offer hope to all of our patients rather than a select few.
I applaud the Foundation for Women’s Cancers for highlighting the importance of trials, and join them in their push for more trial options for not only my own patients, but for all patients with cancer.
The program is now available for this year's Research Community Forum Annual Meeting. Dr. Richard L. Schilsky invites you to join this unique event on September 24-25 in Alexandria, VA.
Here are 10 reasons why we should look at postoperative radiation for regional melanoma.
At the Plenary Session of this year’s ASCO Annual Meeting, the results of a longitudinal trial begun in 2007 showed me that patient engagement is much more important that I had imagined.
We’re making progress in better understanding, and communicating, the many issues surrounding adverse events, although not as fast as we’d like. In the long run, our patients will benefit from all of these initiatives.
The advent of rapid and relatively affordable high-throughput molecular analyses has permitted the development of a bewildering next generation of new cancer diagnostic tests that are being introduced into clinical care using our grandparents’ regulatory structure.
Dr. Richard L. Schilsky outlines the Society's Target Agent and Profiling Utilization Registry (TAPUR) Study and similar international protocols. A global data sharing platform could greatly accelerate our ability to learn about new uses for currently approved targeted anticancer drugs.

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