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ASCOconnection.org is a forum for the exchange of views on topical issues in the field of oncology. The views expressed in the blogs, comments, and forums belong to the authors. They do not necessarily reflect the views or positions of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Please read the Commenting Guidelines.

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For those not in our field, cancer is still seen as a devastating disease starting at the point of diagnosis. As oncology professionals, it’s important that we do not accept death from cancer as inevitable, or even as imminent.
Clinical trials are the pathway to better treatments, better outcomes, and a future without cancer. We, as investigators, need to believe in them, and be willing to offer them to all patients who are eligible. 
Our vice president of Clinical Affairs breaks down the reporting changes you need to understand and address to avoid potential financial penalties in 2020.
Dr. Barbara K. Rimer explains that actions recently highlighted by the President’s Cancer Panel are aligned with ASCO’s recommendation that patients be informed about the costs of care as part of the treatment decision-making process.
It is important to recognize that some of our patients lead chaotic lives. We need to be careful of judging them and labeling them as non-compliant. They are usually just trying their best under difficult or even impossible situations.
ASCO's current president explains why he's passionate about precision medicine, as well as the concerns that keep him up at night. 
Dr. Raj Mohan considers the concept of trust, and notes that what many patients will remember is how you made them feel comfortable as a human being, understood them, and stayed with them through their ups and downs.
A trial of aqueous lidocaine to manage painful intercourse for breast cancer survivors was a small study with a great magnitude of benefit. Do we need to wait for more data, or can we start applying these findings for our patients today?
If we want our patients to have the best possible health outcomes, we need to make sure that their caregivers are also being cared for.
Health care providers have a tendency to talk a lot; we are trained to ask questions, to give information, to provide advice and guidance. But if we just stop and let the silence fill the room we can learn so much from our patients. 
What makes a death dignified? It's in how we live, writes Dr. Manglio Miguel Rizzo. 
I was her doctor, and my job was to give my opinion, even if it could not be backed by any data, and then to respect hers. After all, there was only one person walking this road of cancer, and it was my job to make that road easier. 
Dr. Raj Mohan describes the anxious journey that surgical oncologists and patients with cancer take together, as they wait to see what the histopathology report reveals.
A recent event brought home the significance of how devastating news is received and how we react to a potentially life-changing message.
Almost every day a patient (and often many more than one) asks Dr. Evan Hall, “How will my cancer diagnosis affect my life?” This is a difficult question to answer. 
There are patients who meet the diagnosis of cancer not with dread, but with curiosity, and sometimes their preferred treatment strategy is, "Let's just see what happens."  
Drs. Janet Bull and Lindsay Bonsignore answer thoughtful questions about telemedicine posed by attendees at the 2017 Palliative and Supportive Care in Oncology Symposium.

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