Home >

Blogs

Blogs

ASCOconnection.org is a forum for the exchange of views on topical issues in the field of oncology. The views expressed in the blogs, comments, and forums belong to the authors. They do not necessarily reflect the views or positions of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Please read the Commenting Guidelines.

No Results.

Recently I was asked to think about the ethical aspects of health information technology (HIT), which I confess, is not a subject I had given much thought to before. After all, what could be unethical about such an obvious example of manifest destiny?
Several months ago, I posted a blog on Women in Oncology and to my delight, it really captured the attention of a number of readers. It seems that there is a real interest on the part of...
One of the toughest situations in oncology is the discussion about next steps, particularly when it comes to treatment of recurrent or metastatic disease. I believe very much that it is realistic to offer a patient the hope of cancer as a “chronic disease,” that treatment can result in disease...
The Journal of Oncology Practice (JOP) is in its eighth year of publication and has remained focused on presenting data-oriented articles highlighting issues related to the mechanisms of oncology care delivery.
There is a lot we do not learn in medical school. Much of that added education comes when you rise to a position of management or governance in a practice. Plenty of business publications will tell you that you get the activity you incent for. Many times we do not recognize what the true incentives...
I have been asked several times why I blog and how I find the time to do it. Like some of my colleagues (virtual and real), I blog because it’s cathartic for me and in some small way, I’d like to believe I am promoting a more honest discussion among peers by participating in a forum that allows...
A few months ago I took my then 17-year-old daughter to the Operating Room with me. I had a full day of surgery and she wanted to observe. She’s not really interested in being a doctor, but she is interested in seeing what surgery is all about, and (maybe) seeing how her mother spends her days. It...
A feeling of introspection always marks the end of the year for me. Perhaps it is because of medicine and of oncology—but, as January approaches, I am cognizant of time and how precious it truly is. I find myself reminiscing about the year through photographs (with the help of iPhoto, I have them...
New Years has always been one of my favorite holidays. It’s the one time of year that everyone—regardless of race, religion, or region of residence—gets together to celebrate a year gone by and a new one yet to come. For me, it’s a time of reflection, looking back over the past year, scavenging...
The start of the New Year always brings about a slew of earnest resolutions—many of them having to do with improving one’s health. For the oncology professional, the concept of engaging in conversations with patients about healthy choices brings up some interesting questions. Our patients have...
On Friday morning I was seeing a patient, chatting about the holidays. She had given me a gingerbread house–making kit for my kids—which she had done annually since I had become her doctor. "You are doing so well," I declared, "Have a very Merry Christmas!" "You too!" she said as we hugged and...
“Still having trouble wrapping my head around all the tweets. They say so little…but I’ll keep trying.”
In the November 1 issue of The ASCO Post, Dr. Derek Raghavan discusses the current knowledge regarding neo-adjuvant therapy for...
At mid-point in my career in oncology, I decided I wanted to make a switch from the NIH to direct work with underserved communities, and five years ago, I began a wonderful and evolving journey as Medical Director of the Washington Cancer Institute at the MedStar Washington Hospital Center, in...
I only met her once; she was young—in her mid-thirties—and she had been diagnosed with ovarian cancer during her pregnancy. Following chemotherapy and the delivery of a healthy baby, she underwent a hysterectomy and staging. She was ultimately diagnosed with a rare ovarian cancer: small cell...
Scrolling through Twitter one day, a post caught my attention: “Early detection is not the answer. Finding and treating all stage 0 breast cancer will not prevent all breast cancer deaths.”
"Everything, or everybody, was on the move in every direction... There was no place to stop, no place to dawdle, you either moved on or got mowed down." So was I alerted by Kalpish Ratna, the pseudonym of surgeons Kalpana Swaminathan and Ishrat Syed, through their novel, “Quarantine Papers”. Mumbai...

Pages


Advertisement