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May 17, 2022
"If we, as knowledgeable people, start informing women whom we come across about cervical cancer screening, we add a drop to the ocean of wellness," said Dr. Pesona Grace Lucksom.
May 12, 2022
Since ASCO22 will be offered as a hybrid meeting, with both an in-person and a virtual experience, we get the best of both worlds.
May 12, 2022
Ellen Zhang shares an original poem inspired by the parent-child interactions she witnessed while working with pediatric patients with cancer.
May 02, 2022
Using bibliometrics, Dr. Khalid El Bairi identified a research gap in Morocco, and felt a responsibility to fill it.
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Don S. Dizon, MD, FACP, FASCO

Don S. Dizon, MD, FACP, FASCO, is a professor of medicine and professor of surgery at Brown University, director of the Pelvic Malignancies Program and Hematology-Oncology Outpatient Clinics at Lifespan Cancer Institute, and director of Medical Oncology and the Sexual Health First Responders Clinic at Rhode Island Hospital. He also serves as the head of community outreach and engagement of the Legorreta Cancer Center at Brown University. Dr. Dizon has served as past chair of ASCO's Social Media Working Group and the Cancer Communications Committee. In addition to his regular column on ASCOconnection.org, which has been honored with APEX awards in 2013 and 2014, he is a blogger for The Oncologist and a section editor of Gynecologic Oncology at UpToDate. Dr. Dizon is a member of the JCO Oncology Practice Editorial Board, and editor in chief of the ASCO Educational Book. Follow Dr. Dizon across social media channels @drdonsdizon. 

Disclosure.

Sep 12, 2017
I applaud the Foundation for Women’s Cancers for highlighting the importance of trials, and join them in their push for more trial options for not only my own patients, but for all patients with cancer.
Aug 29, 2017
As I prepare to take on a new professional position, I have been reflecting on what academic medicine means, and how to thrive in it.
Aug 01, 2017
Yes, "at least" my patient was still alive. But, at the end of the day, I knew that would not be comforting. “At least” is never enough, because when it comes to life, most of us—cancer or no cancer—always want more.
Jun 20, 2017
New immunotherapies are offering astounding responses, but my patient's remission came at the cost of debilitating toxicity. How much is too much to bear?
Jun 08, 2017
At the Plenary Session of this year’s ASCO Annual Meeting, the results of a longitudinal trial begun in 2007 showed me that patient engagement is much more important that I had imagined.
May 30, 2017
The phrase "the fight against cancer" assumes only two outcomes: remission or death, no middle ground. Today more than ever, nothing is further from reality.

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