First Follow-up Surveys Conducted for Cancer Control in Primary Care Courses

ASCO International Affairs
Jul 22, 2016 3:19 PM

In the spring of 2015, ASCO partnered with local organizers to hold its first two Cancer Control in Primary Care (CCPC) courses. One year later, follow-up surveys were sent to participants to assess the impact the course had on their practices.

The first CCPC was held in Bhopal, India in March 2015 in partnership with the Asian Institute of Oncology. 94% of respondents said that they had made practice changes based on what they learned at the course; these changes included earlier diagnosis of cancer, counseling patients on behavior change, and screening for cancer.

In addition, respondents reported the following outcomes:

  • 100% said that they are better able to help their patients with their family history.
  • 100% said that they are better able to communicate with patients about how they can reduce their risk for cancer.
  • 82% said that they their communication with patients about their risk for cancer had increased since attending the course.
  • 77% said that their patients were being screened for cancer more than before attending the course.

The second CCPC was held in Gurjaani, Georgia in April 2015 in partnership with the Black Sea Partnership for Breast and Cervical Cancer Control and Prevention. 100% of respondents said that they had made practice changes based on what they learned at the course, including discussing prevention and cancer risk factors with patients and referring patients for screening.

In addition, respondents reported the following outcomes:

  • 96% said that they are better able to help their patients with their family history.
  • 96% said that they are better able to communicate with patients about how they can reduce their risk for cancer.
  • 95% said that they their communication with patients about their risk for cancer had increased since attending the course.
  • 86% said that their patients were being screened for cancer more than before attending the course.