Blogs

Blogs

ASCOconnection.org is a forum for the exchange of views on topical issues in the field of oncology. The views expressed in the blogs, comments, and forums belong to the authors. They do not necessarily reflect the views or positions of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Please read the Commenting Guidelines.

No Results.

How we report clinical trials makes interpreting their results harder. Why shouldn’t we all have more information to make better decisions for our patients?
Deciding whether RNI works depends upon not only accurate risk assessment but also a better understanding of the disease. Here are some key elements of breast cancer and treatment that aren’t adequately decided just by looking at pathologic stage, grade, and surgery type.
To determine when radiation helps treat lymph nodes, we need to carefully interpret surgical findings and accurately stage breast cancer to best understand the risk of lymph node involvement.
Two recently published large clinical trials, NCIC MA.20 and EORTC 22922, raised a lot of interest in and a lot of questions about when radiation helps for treating lymph nodes in breast cancer. The data are more complicated than often presented.
In what is the first (and hopefully one of many) example of using modern genomic methods to match treatments to the molecular defects in prostate cancer, the U.S. FDA has just granted “breakthrough designation” to olaparib.
ASCO CEO Dr. Allen S. Lichter reflects on an optimistic approach to the challenges of providing high-quality cancer care around the globe on World Cancer Day.
Prevention is better than cure—an age-old saying, but one that is highly relevant in these times of increasing incidence of diseases and skyrocketing health care costs, notes Dr. Monica Malik.
One of the most frequent questions I hear in my clinic is, “Are we making any progress?” or, “Is there anything new out there?” The answer is always yes, or more properly, YES!
The past year had been a tremendously exciting time to be an oncologist, and to be a lung cancer oncologist in particular. It seems we hardly have time to get used to one newly approved agent before another one becomes available.
Peer reviewers are assumed to appear fully formed, like Athena springing from Zeus’ forehead, and usually they are not required to undergo any sort of orientation. We aim to change that, in our small way, by creating the JGO Editorial Fellowship.
I think the facet of cancer most commonly misunderstood by non-scientists (patients/families) is heterogeneity. Several presentations at the Prostate Cancer Foundation Annual Retreat touched on this theme.
Winner: Association Media & Publishing 2016 EXCEL Award, Best Single Blog Post
The good kind of problem is having too many choices; the bad kind of problem is having too few choices. Today, I am writing about the ultimate in the good kind of problems: Being an exceptional responder to cancer treatment. I am even trying to enroll in the NCI Exceptional Responders Initiative.
This year’s Community Research Forum Annual Meeting is right around the corner. As Chair of the CRF Council, I am very excited about the Meeting and would like to invite you to participate in this unique opportunity.
Looking back on the 1976 Bonadonna study using CMF chemotherapy in women with breast cancer and positive axillary nodes, I consider what went wrong in the search for similarly effective treatment of prostate cancer.
Clinical investigation forms the backbone and the history of medical oncology. Cancer clinical trials provide the evidence we need to demonstrate safety and efficacy before Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval and evidence for our clinical treatment guidelines. However, it seems to be more...
As physicians who take care of patients with cancer, all of us worldwide have the same goals of cancer prevention, early detection and screening, improvement in the quality of cancer care, and accelerating research and new therapies. The question is, how can we accomplish these goals in a world...
Dr. Robert Mayer and Dr. Gabriel N. Hortobagyi were named as distinguished members of the OncLive 2015 Giants in Cancer class.

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