Blogs

Blogs

ASCOconnection.org is a forum for the exchange of views on topical issues in the field of oncology. The views expressed in the blogs, comments, and forums belong to the authors. They do not necessarily reflect the views or positions of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Please read the Commenting Guidelines.

No Results.

When it comes to many alternative therapies, the data is too sparse to inform discussions on benefits and/or risks, as my patient learned when her supplement use prevented her from continuing on a clinical trial.
On behalf of the ASCO Professional Development Committee, Dr. Suresh S. Ramalingam welcomes you to the Physician Wellness blog, a space for discussion and perspectives on physician wellness and professional burnout.
When faced with a diagnosis of cancer, my patients and their families show more courage than I could ever have imagined.
Dr. Maher Saifo, an oncologist practicing in Syria, discusses how the Syrian war is affecting cancer care in a post written with his patient, Lama Meer Yousef. Together, they share their story of survival and hope against incredible odds.
With new therapies, fortunately, oncologists are now seeing patients over the span of years, and we get to know the person who is the patient beyond their illness. Many also bring along others on visit after visit, and we get to know each of them too.
I cannot count the number of times I have thought to myself, “If it were not for the PSA, you would no doubt be out there playing golf, skiing, biking, taking a grandchild to the park, or just enjoying life.” Living from one PSA to the next is a bad way to mark the passing of time.
As a physician and a mom, I'm doing what all human beings do every day: making decisions about my life, career, and relationships, and hoping for the best.
As we move forward in oncology, my hope is that we will see miraculous recoveries more often, guided not by chance but by a better understanding of cancer biology. The promise of precision medicine remains a real one that I firmly believe in.
As oncologists, we are shaped and molded by our patients. December is a perfect time to reflect on our patients and ourselves, with the hope that we will be able to improve our future.
Survival rates for many types of cancers have continued to improve over the past several decades, contributing to a growing number of long-term cancer survivors. With longer survival, attention to the chronic and long-term adverse treatment effects has become increasingly important.
Writing a prescription is the easiest part of we do in clinic. The harder part is truly understanding the financial burden a cancer diagnosis inflicts on patients and their families.
Many of the couples that I see in my practice grow closer after the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. But for others, the experience of serious illness exposes existing weak points in their relationship.
When we are at the bedside, eye to eye with the patient and their families, we can do more than any website, journal, or even Dr. Google can to help our patients understand their cancer and their treatment.
A medical clinic is not set up for those who take their time, and efficiency is important. But in the short time we have for each patient visit, we must make an effort to be truly present with that person.
Not everyone shares my view of what constitutes a good death, and I’ve come to realize that when a patient has a very different view of the end of life from mine, it can be very difficult to do what’s right.
When the word “cancer” is evoked and you are asked to see an oncologist, a flood of emotions can occur. Often you are even unsure of what questions to ask. I hope this blog will help create a quick reference sheet for a patient during their office visit.
I will never forget the first patient I lost as an attending. Yes, I know that is cliché, but first-time experiences always resonate in our minds.
The foundation of the guideline update is that palliative care should apply from the time of diagnosis, and through treatment, recurrence, and long-term survivorship or the end of life.

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