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Blogs

ASCOconnection.org is a forum for the exchange of views on topical issues in the field of oncology. The views expressed in the blogs, comments, and forums belong to the authors. They do not necessarily reflect the views or positions of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Please read the Commenting Guidelines.

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Mr. Todd Pickard considers the effect of the team on professional burnout. Is your team a source of conflict and disappointment, or a source of confidence?
I take my responsibilities as a physician seriously. But when faced with my own sick child, everything on my to-do list—writing, research, even clinic—went out the window.
When faced with a suffering patient and family, it can be all too easy to blame yourself for their pain. Dr. Nasser Hanna encourages you to remember that the cancer is at fault, not you.
Every year, 400 physicians commit suicide. Nearly 10% of trainees have thought about it in the last two weeks. This is a serious problem that requires a fundamental culture change.
On behalf of the ASCO Professional Development Committee, Dr. Suresh S. Ramalingam welcomes you to the Physician Wellness blog, a space for discussion and perspectives on physician wellness and professional burnout.
As a physician and a mom, I'm doing what all human beings do every day: making decisions about my life, career, and relationships, and hoping for the best.
Medicine, in the words of my friend and mentor Larry Norton, should be a calling, not a glorified profession. Medicine isn’t done in shifts. It’s a commitment made between you and your patients, to oversee their care personally, even when you aren’t around.
Instead of another lecture on how to sign up for social media, I thought I would share my experience, along with specific examples of how it has directly led to professional benefits.
I had the opportunity to interview Dr. Cardinale Smith about Oncotalk, a communications course that she coordinates for oncology professionals and trainees.
One of things I like about academic oncology is the chance to collaborate with others, both within my fields of specialization and outside of them.
I was fortunate to begin my radiation oncology training on our Chairman’s service, working with lung cancer expert Dr. Ken Rosenzweig. At that time, one of my earliest clinical experiences was seeing a woman who had a history of early-stage lung cancer treated with radiation.
The responsibility for treating patients with cancer is tremendous, and it often feels even greater when caring for pediatric patients. The emotional toll on oncologists can be larger, as well.
In the latest workforce study for oncology conducted by ASCO, approximately 30% of practicing oncologists were women. However, this number is expected to grow.
The Chairman always arrived very early, gathered information about what had happened during the night from the head nurse, then retired for a few hours into his studio to write: he was a highly educated man, full of interests. That morning he saw me with my eyes full of tears.
I hesitated when I was offered an opportunity to participate in Oncotalk, a communication course geared towards oncologists.
Effective communication is vital in all aspects of medicine. In today’s multidisciplinary health care setting, the many members of each patient’s health care team need to work together to deliver optimal care...