Blogs

Blogs

ASCOconnection.org is a forum for the exchange of views on topical issues in the field of oncology. The views expressed in the blogs, comments, and forums belong to the authors. They do not necessarily reflect the views or positions of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Please read the Commenting Guidelines.

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I was fortunate to begin my radiation oncology training on our Chairman’s service, working with lung cancer expert Dr. Ken Rosenzweig. At that time, one of my earliest clinical experiences was seeing a woman who had a history of early-stage lung cancer treated with radiation.
The past year had been a tremendously exciting time to be an oncologist, and to be a lung cancer oncologist in particular. It seems we hardly have time to get used to one newly approved agent before another one becomes available.
A few brief updates from the November meetings of the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology (Alliance) and ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group, as well as upcoming meetings.
When is an advocate not an advocate? When should a spouse step back and let the husband make a treatment decision? When should an adult child of a man with prostate cancer let their father decide what is best for him? These are questions that, fortunately, I don’t have to ask all that often. Most...
The responsibility for treating patients with cancer is tremendous, and it often feels even greater when caring for pediatric patients. The emotional toll on oncologists can be larger, as well.
The Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA), which passed earlier this year, repealed the fundamentally flawed Sustainable Growth Rate formula and introduced significant changes in how Medicare will pay oncologists for the care they provide in the coming years.
Helen* had received multiple lines of chemotherapy for a stage IV breast cancer. She had been off treatment for quite a few months now and declined hospice because she did not like strangers in the house.
As physicians practicing in the worlds of oncology and gynecology, we have used this word countless times—hope that cancer will not return, hope that intimacy can be restored, hope that parenthood can be realized despite cancer.
I work at Michigan State University, but I get my cancer care at the University of Michigan. I love both institutions, but when it comes to football, I am MSU Spartans all the way. If you are not from the Great Lakes State, you may not have heard about the outcome of our October 24 match-up. I will...
Bruce cites his upbringing as the impetus to improve cancer care on a global scale. My interests are just as granular and stem from where I was born and raised, in the tiny South Pacific Island of Guam.
The concept of engagement leading to empowerment was a message I have heard loudly and clearly. It was a conversation brewing on social media—a cacophony of voices calling for more access, better information, more direct involvement in their care.
Dear ASCO Member: Over the past year the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) has engaged with ASCO and other stakeholders to listen to the concerns of physicians and redesign their Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. We have advocated for reform and the ABIM is responding.  The...
One of the limited number of positives about having cancer is being able to get away with making cancer jokes. Before I got cancer, I thought up what I believe is the greatest-ever pun involving Midwestern geography and malignant neoplasms, but I was never able to share it—until now. I will include...
We have all seen patients whose distress is off the charts, or off the Distress Thermometer (NCCN). They sit in our offices, dazed and seemingly so depressed that we ask the mandatory question: “Are you thinking of hurting yourself?” Some patients just shake their head, not making eye contact, and...
Winner: Association Media & Publishing 2016 EXCEL Award, Best Single Blog Post
One afternoon, I was seated in front of my computer working when a ping came through, notifying me of a message delivered on Twitter. I stopped what I was doing and scrolled through Twitter and then checked my message. It was from someone I had never met in real life (“IRL,” in social media),...
When I became an attending at Memorial Sloan Kettering (MSKCC), I inherited a panel of patients from one of our doctors who had recently retired. One of them was Alice*, a spritely 70 year-old female. She had been diagnosed with stage III ovarian cancer in her fifties. She had surgery for it...
I have written about the support that a partner/spouse provides to someone living with cancer—with prostate cancer and for young adults with cancer—and I always...

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