Blogs

Blogs

ASCOconnection.org is a forum for the exchange of views on topical issues in the field of oncology. The views expressed in the blogs, comments, and forums belong to the authors. They do not necessarily reflect the views or positions of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Please read the Commenting Guidelines.

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Dr. Nagi El Saghir reflects on the challenges of delivering cancer care in regions rocked by hostilities, but sees hope in impactful educational and scientific meetings such as the recent Beirut Breast Cancer Conference (BBCC-4).
Two recently published large clinical trials, NCIC MA.20 and EORTC 22922, raised a lot of interest in and a lot of questions about when radiation helps for treating lymph nodes in breast cancer. The data are more complicated than often presented.
When patients express fears and misgivings in clinic, there is an opportunity to dispel myths, diminish shame, and focus on living a full life despite cancer.
The American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) invited all ABIM-certified physicians to participate in a review of the blueprints that outline content areas for subspecialty Maintenance of Certification (MOC) exams.
Most times, I feel excited to be an oncologist. Oncology research is accelerating and every week brings more news, whether it be a deeper understanding of tumor genomics, a broader understanding of cancer genetics and risk, and, it seems, more ways to provide precision therapy. Studies are coming...
During 2 weeks of challenging inpatient hospital service, I made it my goal to give my residents the best possible exposure to our field, and to allow them as much autonomy as possible.
Dr. Fredrick Chite Asirwa illustrates that every person in the clinic has an impact on patients.
There are so many myths about cancers and their causation that may be detrimental to cancer control efforts, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, Dr. Fredrick Chite Asirwa explains.
Patients in Dr. Sana Al Sukhun's clinic frequently ask, especially if cancer was on the news, “Is there anything new?” The answer is always yes.
I find I greet the new year with both anticipation and anxiety; this year, however, has thus far been tinged with sadness.
I had the opportunity to interview Dr. Cardinale Smith about Oncotalk, a communications course that she coordinates for oncology professionals and trainees.
There is plenty of research that proves what we intuitively know: a person who is well informed and invested in her treatment is more likely to seek out the resources she needs to cope with the physical and emotional side effects of rigorous treatment.
I like to consider myself an “evolved” clinician—one who believes in the patient’s voice, personally invested in shared decision-making, always ready to support my patient’s decisions, as long as I know it’s informed by the best data I have available, even when it is not the course I would want...
This is a story of how small things really can make a big difference: a nurse anticipating a problem for a patient, a biomedical engineer open to collaboration, and a care provider taking an incremental approach to managing a patient's distress.
One of the most frequent questions I hear in my clinic is, “Are we making any progress?” or, “Is there anything new out there?” The answer is always yes, or more properly, YES!
In November 2008, Michigan voters voted to legalize medical marijuana by a margin of 63% to 37%. At that time, I opposed the measure. Three years later, I developed a different perspective.
One of things I like about academic oncology is the chance to collaborate with others, both within my fields of specialization and outside of them.
She had been a patient for several years, and I still remember meeting her that first time: Her breast cancer was stage IV at diagnosis, already established in her bones; she was scared; she was in pain. Surgery was taken off the table and she was referred for medical therapy. We had discussed...

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