Blogs

Blogs

ASCOconnection.org is a forum for the exchange of views on topical issues in the field of oncology. The views expressed in the blogs, comments, and forums belong to the authors. They do not necessarily reflect the views or positions of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Please read the Commenting Guidelines.

No Results.

In the face of limited health care resources and a rising national health budget, it is important to consider value when making treatment decisions for patients with cancer. This is a key question for all of us involved in cancer care and research. The answer may be a bit different coming from the...
During the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting, a new award will be given out to recognize an extraordinary female leader in oncology and role model who has excelled as a mentor. I encourage you to nominate colleagues for this honor by January 29.
Participate in a Breakout Session on "Perspectives on Physician Aid in Dying" on Friday, January 22, at the 2016 Gastroinestinal Cancers Symposium, led by Chair Dr. George Fisher and speakers Dr. Lynne P Taylor and Dr. Kavitha Ramchandran.
The goal of the Poster Walk at the 2015 Palliative Care in Oncology Symposium was to promote group interaction surrounding poster presentations that deepens the conversation regarding the research, both for poster presenters and poster reviewers joining the walk.
In 2012, in an attempt to answer the call to prioritize interventions, my colleagues and I, with support from the Asian Oncology Summit and Lancet Oncology, discussed and agreed upon a resource-stratified consensus on the management of colon cancer.
Expert office hours were a new event at this year’s Palliative Care in Oncology Symposium, and they were truly a highlight for me. They provided me with the opportunity to sit down with two attendees and visit about palliative care practice and research issues.
A few brief updates from the November meetings of the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology (Alliance) and ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group, as well as upcoming meetings.
For a second year in a row, as part of the ASCO Palliative Care in Oncology Symposium, a Death Cafe event was held. The Death Cafe consists of individuals informally sitting around a table and talking about their own experiences with death and their feelings about their own mortality.
I think the facet of cancer most commonly misunderstood by non-scientists (patients/families) is heterogeneity. Several presentations at the Prostate Cancer Foundation Annual Retreat touched on this theme.
Dear ASCO Member: Over the past year the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) has engaged with ASCO and other stakeholders to listen to the concerns of physicians and redesign their Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. We have advocated for reform and the ABIM is responding.  The...
Building on an enormously successful inaugural Palliative Care in Oncology Symposium in 2014, the 2015 Symposium afforded a wide array of opportunities for oncology and palliative care clinicians and other health care professionals to learn, network, and grow professionally.
The clinic plays an essential role in resident and fellow education.  Seeing patients with cancer in the outpatient setting for scheduled consultations affords trainees the opportunity to practice counseling patients and integrating knowledge to formulate a patient-centered treatment plan. What is...
The NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) Annual Meeting took place August 27-28, 2015, at the National Institutes of Health campus in Bethesda, MD. Themes paralleled those of the ASCO Annual Meeting (#...
In her groundbreaking work with patients experiencing distress in advanced cancer, Dame Cicely Saunders coined the term “total pain” to describe the multidimensional nature of suffering.
The new Expert Office Hours program will pair Palliative Care in Oncology Symposium attendees with a senior researcher to provide essential guidance and foster collaboration.
This year’s Community Research Forum Annual Meeting is right around the corner. As Chair of the CRF Council, I am very excited about the Meeting and would like to invite you to participate in this unique opportunity.
As oncologists, we discuss the topic of death or face our patients’ fears of death on a daily basis. But how much time do we reflect these encounters back to ourselves and our own lives?
Radiation oncology residents and medical oncology fellows interface regularly. Understanding each other’s backgrounds helps improve the care of our mutual patients.

Pages