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ASCOconnection.org is a forum for the exchange of views on topical issues in the field of oncology. The views expressed in the blogs, comments, and forums belong to the authors. They do not necessarily reflect the views or positions of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Please read the Commenting Guidelines.

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Cancer unavoidably leads to losses. Letting go of what I have lost has allowed me to accept and be grateful for what I, for the moment, have. I wish that I could have started doing this without getting sick.
Join fellow attendees to discuss mortality and caring for patients with advanced cancer at the third annual Death Cafe at the 2016 Palliative Care in Oncology Symposium.
Many of the successful, FDA-approved drugs commonly used in cancer care were developed at small biotech or pharma companies—so what role do the "big fish" play?
ASCO CEO Dr. Clifford Hudis describes the Society's Global Oncology programs and the initiatives of the Global Oncology Leadership Task Force. Dr. Hudis asks challenging questions about providing optimal cancer care in low-income countries. 
It’s abundantly clear that more heads are better than one when it comes to cancer care, and that working together as a team of experts (including the patient, who is the expert on their life) leads to the best outcomes.
Support for federal research funding for cancer is not about politics. It's about people. There is no one in our society—liberal, conservative, libertarian, or just don’t care—who isn’t touched in some way by cancer.
Dr. Smita Bhatia's Keynote Address will describe an overview of the current knowledge regarding the role of genomic variation in the development of treatment-related late effects.
In oncology, many patients continue under our care for years and years. These patients become part of our clinic and, dare I say, our lives, and it is the merging of patient-person-friend where, emotionally, being an oncologist can become quite complicated.
Words can harm and words can heal. Using the word "partner" when scheduling an initial appointment with a patient opened the door to a more meaningful relationship, and created an environment of safety and trust.
Ms. Edson, whose experience as a clerk in the cancer and AIDS unit of a research hospital informed her prizewinning play Wit, will serve as one of two Keynote Speakers at the 2016 Palliative Care in Oncology Symposium.
For prostate cancer, there are both challenges and some early positive results from immunotherapy trials that remain intriguing. One of the key challenges is identifying those patients who will benefit from the treatment.
The ASCO Research Community Forum Annual Meeting is in September. As Chair of the Research Community Forum Council, I’m very excited about what’s in store for this year’s meeting and would like to encourage all researchers and research staff to join us for this enriching event.
Sign up today for Expert Office Hours: 25-minute one-on-one meetings with leaders in the field of oncology and palliative care for expert guidance regarding your career development, research, or clinical innovation endeavors.
A patient had the worst news delivered to her in quite possibly the worst possible way. We cannot let our patients feel like they are just a number in our calculated RVUs. They deserve our time, consideration, and empathy—even when we are covering.
The region has seen structural reforms in health care systems, better training of cancer professionals, new initiatives for populations at high risk, expansion of cancer registries and cancer plans, and implementation of policies to improve prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment.
"Scanxiety" doesn't appear in any legitimate dictionaries (yet), but it is a very real experience for patients with cancer. You can help your patients manage their scanxiety by emphasizing that you will be there to guide them based on the results of their scans.
Solving the chemical or mechanical challenges of sex after cancer isn't always enough. My work often involves helping patients connect their body to their head and their heart.
Drug companies play a key role in improving cancer care, but financial toxicity for patients continues to worsen. Eternal vigilance is the price of liberty from excessive drug costs, and we have an ethical obligation to hold pharmaceutical companies accountable.

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