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ASCOconnection.org is a forum for the exchange of views on topical issues in the field of oncology. The views expressed in the blogs, comments, and forums belong to the authors. They do not necessarily reflect the views or positions of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Please read the Commenting Guidelines.

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Drug companies play a key role in improving cancer care, but financial toxicity for patients continues to worsen. Eternal vigilance is the price of liberty from excessive drug costs, and we have an ethical obligation to hold pharmaceutical companies accountable.
My patient chose not to share her cancer diagnosis. She shouldered so much, and did it only with the support of her husband—no friends, no neighbors, not even her children. It was the way she wanted to get through her treatment, but it was a heavy weight to carry.
Follow-on biologics are here to stay, and represent enormous potential for patients with cancer being treated in low- and middle-income countries.
Believe it or not, the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 was passed more than 1 year ago, and program changes begin in less than six months, on Janurary 1, 2017.
Medicine, in the words of my friend and mentor Larry Norton, should be a calling, not a glorified profession. Medicine isn’t done in shifts. It’s a commitment made between you and your patients, to oversee their care personally, even when you aren’t around.
We survivors get lots of sympathy, while our caregivers get taken for granted, much of the time even by us. 
The ASCO Annual Meeting represents the largest and most important meeting of oncologists in the world, and the benefits of attending are numerous. When I arrived at this year's Annual Meeting, I wondered, how well were women represented?
This year's sessions will feature cutting-edge research and opportunities for oncology, palliative care clinicians, and other health care professionals to network, develop collaborations, learn from one another, and grow professionally.
I began serving as Editor in Chief of ASCO Connection in 2006, and will conclude my second term in December 2016. It has been—and is!—a pleasure to lead our member publication, and it will be hard to say goodbye at the end of the year.
Subterfuge never solves sexual dysfunction after cancer. Patients and their partners need to talk to each other, and from that talk comes understanding and sharing and empathy and, eventually, solutions and resolution.
ASCO composed and successfully brought to the AMA-HOD several resolutions representing some of our most pressing concerns and/or initiatives, including regulations on handling hazardous materials, transparency on clinical pathways, reimbursement models, and Part B drug payments.
Last week I introduced the theme I’ve selected for my term as ASCO President, Together, we’ll be making a difference for our patients and in our profession with the help of some game-changing initiatives from ASCO, of which I will describe just a few.
Twitter and Virtual Meeting add new layers of depth to 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting presentations.
Much of the news this week in prostate cancer will be generated by the ASCO Annual Meeting in Chicago. There are likely to be considerable news releases regarding precision medicine, and especially AR-V7, so I thought I would explain this a bit.
We recently converted our electronic record system to EPIC, and the new perspective provides useful illumination. Truly patient-focused care requires that our practice and our records—verbal, written, or electronic—place the patient center stage.
It is my pleasure to welcome you to Chicago for the 52nd ASCO Annual Meeting. I chose the theme of “Collective Wisdom: The Future of Patient-Centered Care and Research” to represent the importance of the multimodal care that is necessary for our patients.
When you and your patient are in uncharted territory in the cancer landscape, the words you choose to communicate uncertainty and the way you convey them matter a great deal.
ASCO has published an updated framework for assessing the relative value of cancer therapies that have been compared in clinical trials in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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