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ASCOconnection.org is a forum for the exchange of views on topical issues in the field of oncology. The views expressed in the blogs, comments, and forums belong to the authors. They do not necessarily reflect the views or positions of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Please read the Commenting Guidelines.

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We’re making progress in better understanding, and communicating, the many issues surrounding adverse events, although not as fast as we’d like. In the long run, our patients will benefit from all of these initiatives.
I think we would like to believe that all of our patients, and their family members, experience personal growth and end up as better human beings after cancer than they were before, but this is certainly not always the case.
Dr. Jane Lowe Meisel reflects on the sense of unease that comes with knowing that cancer can happen to anyone (including oncologists), and turning that feeling into motivation.
Sustaining this progress described in this report will be determined in large part by the level of federal investment in our nation's biomedical research enterprise.
When a dying patient wanted more time at any cost, and our team collectively felt that a code would be inhumane, an ethics consultation helped provide clarity and support for our decision-making.
When everyone around you is telling you that you are overworked and on the verge of burnout, it's time to listen, reflect, and take action for your own well-being.
We may never be able to completely eliminate anxiety and stress before and after scans, yet we can definitely make a difference by confronting scanxiety upfront.
When the basics of cancer control are not in place, should we discuss targeted agents and immunotherapy in resource-constrained settings?
I tend to be cautious with the word cure, because sometimes that is the only thing that patients hear.
ASCO soundly opposes President Trump’s budget outline, which would cut $6 billion from the National Institutes of Health.
A supportive network of women colleagues and friends helps Dr. Uma Borate feel more empowered in her oncology career and in her life.
After a particular draining start to the year, Dr. Shadia I. Jalal reflects on the people and things in her life that give her the strength and resilience to return each day to the challenging work of oncology.
Bad news is something that we in health care are practised in telling, but I for one have never gotten used to it.
I am pleased to share the news that ASCO volunteers, staff, and collaborators are already making progress on major expansions to ASCO's programs to address global oncology priorities.
Whether it's your first or twenty-first time attending the ASCO Annual Meeting, you'll find that connections can happen anywhere, not just during sessions or designated networking events.
The number of women in top leadership positions in many professions, including medicine, is disproportionately low. Leadership skills training, writes Dr. Arti Hurria, can help fix this "leaky pipeline" and help women define their own leadership styles.
Being fully present with her patients at work and with her family at home helps Dr. Jane Lowe Meisel be resilient and maintain her passion for oncology.
When the travel ban was announced, I worried for my patients and for my colleagues. I worried that medical care would be denied to international patients, including those who came to the U.S. for cancer care.

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