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ASCOconnection.org is a forum for the exchange of views on topical issues in the field of oncology. The views expressed in the blogs, comments, and forums belong to the authors. They do not necessarily reflect the views or positions of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Please read the Commenting Guidelines.

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In a divisive time, I look to my patients and see that there is more that unites us than divides us, and this is worth celebrating.
Never doubt that your voice and time matter when it comes to trying to change the world in a positive way. We as a community can come together and really make a difference, and you can see it firsthand any weekend in almost any city across the country.
The line of thinking that women can do without their breasts only makes breast cancer treatment easier for us as physicians, not for our patients. When it's your own body, every organ is vital.
When accommodating the needs of an anxious patient, some would suggest that I am aiding and abetting a maladaptive coping style and that I am not helping him at all. But for me, this is the definition of patient-centered care.
Yes, "at least" my patient was still alive. But, at the end of the day, I knew that would not be comforting. “At least” is never enough, because when it comes to life, most of us—cancer or no cancer—always want more.
Everyone has a story about why they became a doctor. But I don’t know anyone who became a doctor because they love paperwork.
My father was diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer on the night of my very first call as an intern. As his illness progressed, I learned that in the period of dying, between all we can do and nothing we can do, is a sacred space.
"It is not just for us, the health care providers, to set the vocabulary around cancer. We need to ask those whom the term affects," says Professor Bogda Koczwara. "People are not just the diseases that afflict them."
When a patient is prone to missing appointments, I try to remember that cancer is never easy, and it is especially difficult for those whose lives are chaotic.
Good communication isn’t learned overnight. It takes many years of watching and modeling mentors who are blessed with this subtle skill, as well as training and practice.
We do not have clear guidance on what sexual practices are safe during chemotherapy, and much of what we advise patients is based on our best guesses. How then do we counsel patients like mine, who are on continuous chemotherapy?
The phrase "the fight against cancer" assumes only two outcomes: remission or death, no middle ground. Today more than ever, nothing is further from reality.
Mr. Todd Pickard considers the effect of the team on professional burnout. Is your team a source of conflict and disappointment, or a source of confidence?
I take my responsibilities as a physician seriously. But when faced with my own sick child, everything on my to-do list—writing, research, even clinic—went out the window.
Every time I’ve received a gift from a patient, I feel humbled and slightly embarrassed, for, really, I’m just doing my job. But I treasure each one, tangible or intangible.
In oncology, we cannot define our victories by cure, but by the quality of life we are able to provide for our patients.
Dr. Sibel Blau's community practice implemented a new model of value-based care delivery to improve the patient experience. The transition was challenging but allows the practice to deliver higher quality care than ever before.

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