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ASCOconnection.org is a forum for the exchange of views on topical issues in the field of oncology. The views expressed in the blogs, comments, and forums belong to the authors. They do not necessarily reflect the views or positions of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Please read the Commenting Guidelines.

From the President
We don’t know what the future will bring, but we do know that it will be molded by well-trained, bright minds with good ideas who have the resources to be successful.
When you see enough remarkable recoveries, it becomes tempting to believe it is not only the drugs—that it is you. Where there is the Lazarus effect, perhaps there is the resurgence of the God complex as well.
I want to thank and pay tribute to the oncology nurses who are a true blessing and essential to providing exceptional care for my patients.
When faced with a suffering patient and family, it can be all too easy to blame yourself for their pain. Dr. Nasser Hanna encourages you to remember that the cancer is at fault, not you.
Every year, 400 physicians commit suicide. Nearly 10% of trainees have thought about it in the last two weeks. This is a serious problem that requires a fundamental culture change.
I think we would like to believe that all of our patients, and their family members, experience personal growth and end up as better human beings after cancer than they were before, but this is certainly not always the case.
Dr. Jane Lowe Meisel reflects on the sense of unease that comes with knowing that cancer can happen to anyone (including oncologists), and turning that feeling into motivation.
When a dying patient wanted more time at any cost, and our team collectively felt that a code would be inhumane, an ethics consultation helped provide clarity and support for our decision-making.
We may never be able to completely eliminate anxiety and stress before and after scans, yet we can definitely make a difference by confronting scanxiety upfront.
I tend to be cautious with the word cure, because sometimes that is the only thing that patients hear.
Bad news is something that we in health care are practised in telling, but I for one have never gotten used to it.
When the travel ban was announced, I worried for my patients and for my colleagues. I worried that medical care would be denied to international patients, including those who came to the U.S. for cancer care.
Making patients happy isn't just about doing whatever they ask. As health care professionals, we have an obligation to look out for their best interests.
When it comes to many alternative therapies, the data is too sparse to inform discussions on benefits and/or risks, as my patient learned when her supplement use prevented her from continuing on a clinical trial.
On behalf of the ASCO Professional Development Committee, Dr. Suresh S. Ramalingam welcomes you to the Physician Wellness blog, a space for discussion and perspectives on physician wellness and professional burnout.
When faced with a diagnosis of cancer, my patients and their families show more courage than I could ever have imagined.
Dr. Maher Saifo, an oncologist practicing in Syria, discusses how the Syrian war is affecting cancer care in a post written with his patient, Lama Meer Yousef. Together, they share their story of survival and hope against incredible odds.
With new therapies, fortunately, oncologists are now seeing patients over the span of years, and we get to know the person who is the patient beyond their illness. Many also bring along others on visit after visit, and we get to know each of them too.

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