Latest Blogs

May 16, 2017
Dr. Julia Close invites women attending the ASCO Annual Meeting to be a part of conversations about gender in medicine at the Women's Networking Center, either by joining for planned session or simply by stopping by to meet colleagues and have a cup of coffee.
May 12, 2017
Mr. Todd Pickard considers the effect of the team on professional burnout. Is your team a source of conflict and disappointment, or a source of confidence?
May 08, 2017
If you say things of consequence, there may be consequences; but the alternative is to be inconsequential. Particularly in these tumultuous times for health care and research, we need to speak up!
May 08, 2017
Every time I’ve received a gift from a patient, I feel humbled and slightly embarrassed, for, really, I’m just doing my job. But I treasure each one, tangible or intangible.
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Don S. Dizon, MD, FACP

Don S. Dizon, MD, FACP, is an Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School and is Clinical Co-Director of Gynecologic Oncology at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Cancer Center, where he also is Founder and Director of the Oncology Sexual Health Clinic. Dr. Dizon serves as Chair for ASCO's Social Media Working Group and is Immediate Past Chair of the Cancer Communications Committee. In addition to his regular column on ASCOconnection.org, which has been honored with APEX awards in 2013 and 2014, he is a blogger for MGH and a Section Editor of Gynecologic Oncology at UpToDate. Dr. Dizon is a member of the Journal of Clinical Oncology Editorial Board, and Editor in Chief of the ASCO Educational Book. Follow Dr. Dizon on Twitter @drdonsdizon.

Apr 09, 2015
That question is perhaps the most common one raised by patients facing a diagnosis of cancer for the first time. There are so many campaigns about how to “avoid” cancer: no white sugar, no chemicals, all-plant diets, regular exercise, don’t smoke, don’t drink. I can see how one can get the...
Mar 25, 2015
She was so young—only 32 when diagnosed with ovarian cancer. She had given birth to a son only four months earlier and by all rights should have been celebrating being a new mother. But, instead, she had developed acute pelvic pain, undergone emergent removal of her uterus and ovaries, and was now...
Mar 13, 2015
I happened to be standing in her office when Tina, our research nurse, received an email from one of our patients. This patient had recurrent ovarian cancer and was on her third-line of treatment. She was seen at our center for clinical trials, and Tina and I had spent some time discussing one...
Feb 26, 2015
Every so often I see a patient who views cancer as a constant threat to be handled. The cancer becomes so significant that she feels she can never let her guard down. I always worry about this—partly because that singular focus on fighting cancer can sometimes detract one from other aspects of life...
Feb 12, 2015
She had come to see me in consultation. A professor at a local university, she was well until four years earlier, when she developed abdominal bloating and pain—tell-tale signs of ovarian cancer. Surgery followed, then adjuvant chemotherapy with intraperitoneal treatments (“Terrible regimen,” she...
Jan 29, 2015
Mom. Dad. Happy. Sad. Friend. Trust. I remember playing this game. A friend would say one thing, and then I would say the first thing that came to my mind. For some reason, it would pass the time. I remember how some words would spark an emotion or a memory. Sometimes happy, sometimes not so happy...

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