Latest Blogs

May 16, 2017
Dr. Julia Close invites women attending the ASCO Annual Meeting to be a part of conversations about gender in medicine at the Women's Networking Center, either by joining for planned session or simply by stopping by to meet colleagues and have a cup of coffee.
May 12, 2017
Mr. Todd Pickard considers the effect of the team on professional burnout. Is your team a source of conflict and disappointment, or a source of confidence?
May 08, 2017
If you say things of consequence, there may be consequences; but the alternative is to be inconsequential. Particularly in these tumultuous times for health care and research, we need to speak up!
May 08, 2017
Every time I’ve received a gift from a patient, I feel humbled and slightly embarrassed, for, really, I’m just doing my job. But I treasure each one, tangible or intangible.
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Don S. Dizon, MD, FACP

Don S. Dizon, MD, FACP, is an Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School and is Clinical Co-Director of Gynecologic Oncology at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Cancer Center, where he also is Founder and Director of the Oncology Sexual Health Clinic. Dr. Dizon serves as Chair for ASCO's Social Media Working Group and is Immediate Past Chair of the Cancer Communications Committee. In addition to his regular column on ASCOconnection.org, which has been honored with APEX awards in 2013 and 2014, he is a blogger for MGH and a Section Editor of Gynecologic Oncology at UpToDate. Dr. Dizon is a member of the Journal of Clinical Oncology Editorial Board, and Editor in Chief of the ASCO Educational Book. Follow Dr. Dizon on Twitter @drdonsdizon.

Oct 05, 2015
One afternoon, I was seated in front of my computer working when a ping came through, notifying me of a message delivered on Twitter. I stopped what I was doing and scrolled through Twitter and then checked my message. It was from someone I had never met in real life (“IRL,” in social media),...
Sep 29, 2015
When I became an attending at Memorial Sloan Kettering (MSKCC), I inherited a panel of patients from one of our doctors who had recently retired. One of them was Alice*, a spritely 70 year-old female. She had been diagnosed with stage III ovarian cancer in her fifties. She had surgery for it...
Sep 09, 2015
Jodi* had been diagnosed with ovarian cancer several years earlier, had received adjuvant carboplatin and paclitaxel therapy, relapsed three years later, and since then, had been on several forms of therapy—most recently receiving weekly paclitaxel. She was tolerating treatment well, but a CT scan...
Aug 31, 2015
She had come to see me as a second opinion; diagnosed with uterine serous cancer, one of the more aggressive types of uterine cancers. At surgery they found that it had metastasized to her nodes—stage III disease.
Aug 13, 2015
By Don S. Dizon, MD, FACP, and Elaine M. Doroff Significant psychological distress often accompanies the first diagnosis of cancer, but for most patients, I find the distress fades as the cancer gets treated and ultimately becomes a part of their past. Life resumes a new normalcy, interrupted only...
Jul 27, 2015
I had taken care of her for many years; recommended the adjuvant treatment for her triple-negative breast cancer, then later—walking her through treatment when we found it had recurred in her liver. We had hoped for a long-lasting remission, but then she developed bone and lung metastases.

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