Latest Blogs

Jun 13, 2017
"Reflection kept bringing me back to a simple truth: my job as a mother and my job as a physician are strikingly similar," writes Dr. Stephanie Graff.
Jun 13, 2017
Dr. McAneny's broad expertise and insight on today’s challenging health care environment will greatly benefit the practice of medicine and our patients.
Jun 12, 2017
Preparing for the future starts with gaining clarity about the present state of oncology care. Our goal is for practices in all settings across the U.S. to provide feedback in the 2017 ASCO Practice Census.
Jun 09, 2017
"My health is important, just as my job is important," Dr Adetokunbo Oluwasanjo writes. "And it is so okay to be a doctor and a patient at the same time."
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Don S. Dizon, MD, FACP

Don S. Dizon, MD, FACP, is an Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School and is Clinical Co-Director of Gynecologic Oncology at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Cancer Center, where he also is Founder and Director of the Oncology Sexual Health Clinic. Dr. Dizon serves as Chair for ASCO's Social Media Working Group and is Immediate Past Chair of the Cancer Communications Committee. In addition to his regular column on ASCOconnection.org, which has been honored with APEX awards in 2013 and 2014, he is a blogger for MGH and a Section Editor of Gynecologic Oncology at UpToDate. Dr. Dizon is a member of the Journal of Clinical Oncology Editorial Board, and Editor in Chief of the ASCO Educational Book. Follow Dr. Dizon on Twitter @drdonsdizon.

Nov 11, 2016
Not everyone shares my view of what constitutes a good death, and I’ve come to realize that when a patient has a very different view of the end of life from mine, it can be very difficult to do what’s right.
Oct 06, 2016
It's a mistake to assume that we become more prepared for death as we get older.
Sep 27, 2016
We all strive to provide evidence-based medicine, yet putting it into practice can sometimes be the most challenging part of being a doctor.
Aug 23, 2016
In oncology, many patients continue under our care for years and years. These patients become part of our clinic and, dare I say, our lives, and it is the merging of patient-person-friend where, emotionally, being an oncologist can become quite complicated.
Aug 04, 2016
A patient had the worst news delivered to her in quite possibly the worst possible way. We cannot let our patients feel like they are just a number in our calculated RVUs. They deserve our time, consideration, and empathy—even when we are covering.
Jul 14, 2016
My patient chose not to share her cancer diagnosis. She shouldered so much, and did it only with the support of her husband—no friends, no neighbors, not even her children. It was the way she wanted to get through her treatment, but it was a heavy weight to carry.

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