FEATURED BLOGS
Sep 15, 2017
When a new patient comes to see you about a cancer diagnosis, think about the invisible things they may be carrying to the visit, such as fear, anxiety, sleepless nights, financial worries, and...
Sep 14, 2017
Dr. Dinesh Pendharkar outlines the current work of ASCO's International Affairs Committee. A particular emphasis this year is fostering clinical research in oncology through capacity and skill...
Sep 12, 2017
I applaud the Foundation for Women’s Cancers for highlighting the importance of trials, and join them in their push for more trial options for not only my own patients, but for all patients with...
Sep 12, 2017
As fellows, we are the faculty members and program directors of tomorrow, so it really is up to us to make sense of how to maintain the necessary rigor to get through medical training but also how to...
Sep 06, 2017
In this issue’s Trainee & Early-Career section, Dr. Melissa Loh shares thoughtful, practical advice for oncology fellows thinking about...
Aug 30, 2017
The concept of a person having cancer and not needing any treatment was somewhat foreign to Dr. Suneel D. Kamath when he first started training. However, within just a few months, he realized that...
Aug 28, 2017
After more than 10 years of college, medical school, and training, you’re finally an attending! Many people feel that this transition is harder than starting internship, because all of a sudden, you—...

Latest Comments & Discussions


Adetokunbo Oluwasanjo, MD
Jul 01, 2017
I just love those “mandatory training required” emails....they have a way of washing away your hopes for a little breathing space...

Prateek Mendiratta, MD
Jun 30, 2017
Ms Denzler,   Thanks again for taking the time to respond and comment on my recent blog.  Your suggestions and comments are...

Brenda Denzler
Jun 30, 2017
I can think of a few hints for the "learning to communicate better" part of oncology practice. (1) Never dismiss a patient's concern by...

Prateek Mendiratta, MD
Jun 29, 2017
Ms Madden,   Thanks again for taking the time to read my blog and for commenting.  It is deeply appreciated.  Your...

Debra L. Madden, BA
Jun 29, 2017
Dr. Mendiratta, I can't thank you enough for the thoughts you've shared here with your colleagues.  As a two-time cancer survivor...

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As I prepare to take on a new professional position, I have been reflecting on what academic medicine means, and how to thrive in it.
After more than 10 years of college, medical school, and training, you’re finally an attending! Many people feel that this transition is harder than starting internship, because all of a sudden, you—and only you—are calling the shots.
The concept of a person having cancer and not needing any treatment was somewhat foreign to Dr. Suneel D. Kamath when he first started training. However, within just a few months, he realized that this is the case for thousands of people.
ASCO has compiled resources for oncology care providers and patients in Texas, Louisiana, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina, and will be sharing updates on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.
In this issue’s Trainee & Early-Career section, Dr. Melissa Loh shares thoughtful, practical advice for oncology fellows thinking about pursuing a second degree while completing ...

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